Quix Tip: 5 Excellent Reasons to Walk

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 “In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” – John Muir

1 – Your inner health

Wallace Stevens said, “Perhaps the truth depends on a walk around the lake.” We all experience moments in the day that are extremely challenging. Taking a break from them and re-gathering your energy can really help to change your perspective and regain your sense of humor when faced with the foibles of the human comedy.

2 – Your Physical health

Walking at a moderate pace for 30-60 minutes burns stored fat and can build muscle to speed up your metabolism. Walking an hour a day is also associated with reducing your risk of heart disease, breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes and stroke. Studies have shown that people using a pedometer walk an additional mile each day. That adds up!

3 – Your wallet

If you walk more on small errands or even walk to work, you’re saving gas money, along with making a health investment for your future. As you build up your walking practice, remember what Steven Wright said, “Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.”

4 – Your powers of observation

John Burroughs said, “To find new things, take the path you took yesterday.” If you have a daily practice of walking you’ll be amazed at the small changes you can daily and weekly see in the nature that you walk through.

5 – Your innovation

Friedrich Nietzsche said, “All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.” When you pull your nose back from the glass, you get a fresh perspective. Fresh air and sunlight are both food for the brain. Remember, Velcro was invented because someone went for a walk.

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Seven Skills For Influencing Negotiations

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  1. Ask questions – of yourself too. Asking questions (that you really want to know the answer to) engages the neo-cortex in the brain, which keeps unhelpful emotions out and the thinking brain engaged.
  2. What’s the story behind the story?  Look for the underlying emotions – what is really being said. Or partner with someone who has this talent for empathy.
  3. How close are you? How close are your common interests? Focus on the commonalities, not the differences.
  4. Get creative with solutions (together) – If you brainstorm together, you not only build the capacity for some innovative ideas, but you build good will together.
  5. Focus on underlying needs – yours and theirs. Let go of entrenched positions.
  6. Clear out your unhelpful emotions – anger, worry, fear, etc. And name theirs (to yourself first, and if it’s helpful, address with them)
  7. Walk a mile in their shoes – what are their joys, highs and lows, pain points?

Learn more:

The Negotiation Quest - Get a mutual “yes” by sleuthing out both sides’ preferred approaches to negotiation. Explore universal needs that all negotiators have in common and find out how to address them.

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Quix Tip: What Flour Did You Bake With While Negotiating Today?

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We negotiate all the time, all day long, (even with ourselves), often without realizing it. Think about the different small negotiations you had with your spouse, kids, co-worker or self today and yesterday.

What was your style in these negotiations? There is a Danish folk saying that asserts, “You must bake with the flour you have.” In fact, you probably can’t bake at all with flour you don’t have.

How effective were you with your “flour”? What parts of your style would you like to use more? What would you like to use less? How would you like to refine your particular technique? What’s your style when you’re under stress? When you’re relaxed? What small successes with your preferred style would you like to celebrate?

Focusing on your preferred style in small negotiations helps you play to your strengths, play your game instead of someone else’s, and negotiate at your best.

Learn more:

The Negotiation Quest - Get a mutual “yes” by sleuthing out both sides’ preferred approaches to negotiation. Explore universal needs that all negotiators have in common and find out how to address them.

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Quix Tip: Give Gratitude

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“We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.” 
- Thornton Wilder

1. Tell someone five things you’re grateful for that happened this day/week/month/year.

2. Ask them to tell you five things they’re grateful for.

3. Tell someone (in person if possible) why you’re grateful for them specifically – tell them the positive effect they’ve had in your life.

4. Notice how you feel after giving your gratitude.

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Quix Tip: Dust For Prints

snow-2589838_1280In old detective movies, the police would dust for fingerprints. Here’s your chance to dust your own:

1. Dust for prints from your memory – Think of some examples of when you have had a positive impact on the lives of those around you. Each of these is a clue to uncovering your strengths.

2. Dust for prints by having a ‘strengths conversation’ with someone who knows you fairly well. Ask them what about you has really helped or inspired them recently.

3. Tell your people something about them that has inspired you.

Learn more:

StrengthsFinder - Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action.

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Quix Tip: Soundtrack

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Think of a project that you’re going to work on today or this week that you’d like to energize.

Picture yourself in action, completing the hard work as if you were in a movie.

What kind of music would you like to hear playing if you were the director? What songs best fit this dramatic, exciting scene?

Play that song list, album or radio station that will help you perform at your best.

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Good Hours by Robert Frost (Pocket Poem)

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 Good Hours by Robert Frost

I had for my winter evening walk—
No one at all with whom to talk,
But I had the cottages in a row
Up to their shining eyes in snow.

And I thought I had the folk within:
I had the sound of a violin;
I had a glimpse through curtain laces
Of youthful forms and youthful faces.

I had such company outward bound.
I went till there were no cottages found.
I turned and repented, but coming back
I saw no window but that was black.

Over the snow my creaking feet
Disturbed the slumbering village street
Like profanation, by your leave,
At ten o’clock of a winter eve.

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Quix Tip: Top Ten Songs You Can Play Along With on Your C Harmonica

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If you have a harmonica in the key of C you can play along with recordings of these songs. Pick your spot on the harmonica and try drawing air in, or blowing air out. It’s fun and easy too!

  1. Piano Man by Billy Joel – Play out more than in, melody is in the middle, starting on Hole Six, Blow out.
  2. Love Me Do by the Beatles – Draw in first on the bottom three holes and then when the chord changes, blow out on the bottom three holes. Repeat. Or try playing the single note melody on the middle of the harmonica. The first note is Hole Five, draw in.
  3. Come Together by the Beatles – This very easy melody can be played almost entirely on Holes Four and Five, drawing in. Start on Hole Five, drawing in.
  4. Early in the Morning by Louis Jordan – Draw in first on the bottom three holes and then when the chord changes, blow out on the bottom three holes to play this blues rumba. Repeat. In the one spot of the song that sounds different, draw in on Hole One only.
  5. Ode to Joy by Pete Seeger (This lovely version of Beethoven’s melody from the Ninth Symphony is on Pete’s album simply titled Pete) Play out more than in. Melody is in the middle. Start on Hole Five – blow out.
  6. Rawhide by Frankie Laine (yes, this is the same classic Rawhide that the Blues Brothers did) – Play the melody only. The first phrase moves back and forth on Hole Two, blow out and then Hole Three, blow out, starting on Hole Two. The second phrase moves back and forth on Hole Two, draw in and then Hole Three, draw in and moves up from there.
  7. Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis Presley (His version on Aloha From Hawaii begins in the key of C) – Play the melody, the first three notes are Hole Four, blow out; Hole Six, blow out; Hole Four, blow out.
  8. These Boots Are Made For Walkin’ by Nancy Sinatra – Play the melody starting (and staying on for a while) Hole Five, Blow out.
  9. We Shall Overcome, Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen, and Swing Low Sweet Chariot (all recordings by Charlie Haden and Hank Jones on their beautiful album of spirituals Steal Away) – Try playing the melodies on the middle of the harmonica.
  10. Batman (the original wacky 60s TV show theme) – Draw in first on the bottom three holes and then when the chord changes blow out on the bottom three holes. Then repeat. In the one spot of the song that sounds different, draw in on Hole One only. Don’t forget to also add the ‘Bat-man’ vocal part!

*The melodies of any simple folk songs, most Americana songs (Shenandoah, Amazing Grace, etc.) can be played, also spirituals and nursery rhymes. You don’t need a recording, just try to find the melody in the middle of the harmonica.

Where to get a C harmonica – If you’re a graduate of our Play the Blues program you are already the owner of a C harmonica. If you’re not, it’s time to get your team in tune and give us a call! If you want to try these songs on your own before then, go to a music store and ask for a harmonica in the key of C. Or here on Amazon.

Where to get recordings of these songs – The iTunes store, the library or your favorite local music store.

Learn more:

Play the Blues - Learn to play the blues harmonica in just two hours! Each team member will receive their own harmonica, a copy of Blues Harmonica for Beginners book and play-a-long CD. Within minutes you will be playing a real blues song together. The grand finale features your team as the stars performing an original blues song that you have created together!

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Quest Story: Buddy Guy’s Chicago Blues Quest

Born in 1936, Buddy Guy grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. As a teenager he discovered his quest – playing the blues guitar. When he was 21 years old, he left Louisiana to seek his fortune in Chicago, where such legends as Muddy Waters, Howling Wolf and Little Walter were at the peak of their powers. Almost painfully shy and self-critical, his money ran out. He didn’t have any gigs and he started thinking about heading back home. His luck changed when he was invited to audition at the famous 708 club, where Muddy Waters heard him.

“I was going on my third day without eating in Chicago, trying to borrow a dime to call my mom to get back to Louisiana. And Muddy Waters bought me a salami sandwich and put me in the back of his 1958 Chevy station wagon. He said, ‘You’re hungry, and I know it.’ And talking to Muddy Waters, I wasn’t hungry anymore; I was full just for him to say, ‘Hey.’ I was so overjoyed about it, my stomach wasn’t cramping anymore. I told him that, and Muddy said, ‘Get in the car.”

He competed in guitar battles, where he emulated the showmanship of his childhood hero Guitar Slim. “I just walked out there with this 150-foot cord, and it was snowing, and I just went straight on out the door. The next day the news media was there, wanting to know who I was.” His performance at a competition in 1958 battling with guitar legends Magic Sam and Otis Rush earned him his first recording contract.

Buddy Guy’s fiery, exuberant and at times anarchic guitar playing and singing has entertained audiences around the world, from his early days backing up Muddy Waters and playing with the great harmonica player Junior Wells, to his highly successful solo career. His club, Buddy Guy’s Legends, is one of the most popular tourist destinations in ‘Sweet Home Chicago.’

Learn more:

Play the Blues - Learn to play the blues harmonica in just two hours! Each team member will receive their own harmonica, a copy of Blues Harmonica for Beginners book and play-a-long CD. Within minutes you will be playing a real blues song together. The grand finale features your team as the stars performing an original blues song that you have created together!

Posted in Music, Quest Stories | Comments closed

What do you want to see in 2020?

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In 1968, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke dreamed up the film and the book 2001: A Space Odyssey.

George Orwell published his dystopian novel 1984 in 1949.

It’s 2018. The next number with meaning is the year 2020. That is now about 100 weeks away.

Numbers like these are tools to help us think bigger.

What do you want to see 2020?

What do you want to see clearly 100 weeks from now?

The time to start on what you want is now. Today. There is no need to look back when you hit 2020 and wish you had worked on something else more important for the last two years.

There is something in you, something about you that is unique to you. Some change you want to make and help the world with. What is it now? How will you be the change you want to see in the world when you can see clearly – 20/20?

 

Learn more:

How to Lead Change -  Learn how to be an effective change leader and lead positive change that lasts.

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