Category Archives: StrengthsFinder

Why share your StrengthsFinder strengths with your team?

Here are ten reasons. It’s the best of you. Your top five strengths are your signature strengths, what you do best. This is the height of your abilities in all facets of your life. Don’t hide your light under a basket, let it shine.It’s your rocket fuel. When you use these strengths to get your work done you do it faster, more efficiently and more happily than if you weren’t using your strengths.There are no bad strengths. All strengths are good strengths. StrengthsFinder is different than the MBTI or DISC or other assessments. Weaknesses and blind spots aren’t part of the language. StrengthsFinder is completely positive. It’s your best chance at success – in life and work. Research shows that people that play to their strengths are more successful by far than people that focus on their weaknesses and try to overcome them.If there’s one you really don’t like, pick a different one. Don’t like one? Pick a different one – one that you’re surprised didn’t show up in your StrengthsFinder results. Make sure your picked strength is true to you though, not just wishful thinking.Your team can help you see you how you use your strengths. They can give you examples of that strength in action in your work life and can help reinforce them and remind you to keep focusing on them.You can help your team mates. You can help them use theirs and you can help them more effectively if you’re using yours. Happiness increases more if you’re giving help than getting it.When you make your strengths public you’re more likely to focus on them and use them more. We can all use our strengths even more. Positive self-change works best when you make your change effort public so you can get support and accountability help.You create a positive feedback loop. When you’re focusing on your best and other team members are as well, and then when you focus on each other’s strengths it creates a virtuous upward cycle of greater success and happiness.It builds trust on your team. Seeing each other’s unique strengths differences reinforces the concept that you need each other – others have strengths you don’t, and you have strengths others don’t. You can rely on each other to be a ‘whole’ team, not just trying to be a solitary hero. Depending on each other lets us be vulnerable and builds trust. PS – StrengthsFinder is now completely revamped and updated with the latest research! Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. Click here to start transforming your team.

Also posted in Strengths | Comments closed

What if you can’t start with the CEO when you build a strengths-based culture?

According to Gallup, there are five steps to building a strengths-based culture.  Start with the CEO or it doesn’t work.Require every employee to discover their strengths.Build an internal network of strengths coaches.Integrate strengths into performance management.Transform your learning programs. But what if you can’t start with the CEO? What if he or she isn’t bought in yet, is suspicious of the strengths concept, or is too busy to care? Gallup recommends that you start with a team, a division or a department. Create a strengths-based sub-culture in the organization. Treat these sub-cultures like test cases to demonstrate ROI. If you can demonstrate that ‘the proof is in the pudding’, then you’ll get the CEO on board. Start with yourself and your team and as Gandhi said, ‘be the change you wish to see in the world.’ Or in this case the change you wish to see in your company’s culture. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter)  PS – StrengthsFinder is now completely revamped and updated with the latest research! Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. Click here to start transforming your team.

Also posted in Strengths | Comments closed

Who do the most engaged employees and the least engaged employees talk to?

Who do the most engaged employees and the least engaged employees talk to? According to Gallup, engaged employees spend the least time working alone. Instead they spend more time communicating with their manager. That’s great! The least engaged employees spend the most time with their customers. Uh-oh. That’s not who you want to have talking to your customers. Emotions are contagious. Engaged customers lead to increased sales, increased revenue, increased stock prices – it’s the Gallup Path. Least engaged employees? They’re not helping with any of that. If you were wondering how important engagement and the quality of managers were, here’s your answer. Want more of the juicy good stuff like increased profit and higher stock prices? It all leads back to engaged employees using their strengths every day, extensively guided by great managers. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Passion, Strengths, Strong management | Comments closed

The two part formula for flextime

According to Gallup, the ideal outcome of flexible work is two parts. AutonomyAccountability This aligns with knowing your people’s StrengthsFinder strengths. Using our strengths to get the work done is an extremely personal process. No one can chart that course for us, because no one really knows what it’s like to be us. Great managers define the end zone, but not the path to get there. And accountability is easy if we’re using our strengths. We get things done faster and more efficiently if we’re using our strengths.  If you’re a leader experiment with increased autonomy and increased demand for accountability. And if you’re a worker hoping for more autonomy, you first need to demonstrate that you’re accountable. Then ask for more autonomy. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Passion | Comments closed

It all starts with strengths

According to Gallup, the path to stock increases, revenue growth, increased sales, most anything a company wants, is through identifying strengths. Whatever you want for your company, your business unit, your team, your personal success all leads back to strengths – identifying strengths and then using strengths every day. It all starts with strengths. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Strengths | Comments closed

What percent of Americans plan to work past age 65?

74%. That’s a lot of people! Unfortunately, the data doesn’t show what the percentage is of ‘want to keep working’ vs. ‘have to keep working’.  However, in a recent survey it was found that 21% of working Americans aren’t saving anything at all, and 69% of working Americans are saving between zero and ten percent of what they make. And the percent of people saving nothing jump up when it’s just Millennials and Gen X in the mix. These two age groups are hardly saving at all.  A lot of people are going to be working past age 65 because they have to. Are you more engaged if you have to do something or if you want to do something? Are kids more engaged building snow forts or shoveling the sidewalk? So, this means that we’re growing a work force that is going to be less engaged as they age. You may even be one of them. If so, start saving today. Cut your expenses and save that money. You can keep working as long as you want, but you’ll be happier if you keep working because you want to instead of because you have to. And if you end up having to or are in that situation right now? Find your strengths, and use them every day. Your engagement level will rise and you’ll be happier. And your emotions – happiness included – are contagious. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Passion, Strengths | Comments closed

Globally, what percent of employees are either not engaged or are actively disengaged at work?

Globally, what percent of employees are either not engaged or are actively disengaged at work? 85% That’s most of us. It’s a sobering number. The U.S. numbers are a little better. As of 2018, 34% – a third – employees are actively engaged. That still means 2/3 of us aren’t.  So there’s work to be done, by all of us.  To be kinder to each other because so many of us are unhappy. And all of us humans want to be happy. And to help each other find a way through to engagement with our work. An engaged person is a happier, more fulfilled person.  And it starts with finding, then using, our #1 engagement tool we were born with – our strengths.  Learn more: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Passion, Strengths | Comments closed

What are the right strengths to have on a team?

What are the right strengths to have on a team? Teams ask me this question all the time during StrengthsFinder trainings. “Do we have the right strengths? What are we missing?”  Gallup found something interesting when they tried to figure out the right strengths to have on a team. They found it doesn’t matter as much what the composition of team strengths is. What matters most is the awareness of the strengths that are on the team already.  You can’t use the tools you don’t know you have. Take the StrengthsFinder assessment with your team, link it to what it looks like in real life and expand from there. Learn more: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. (data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

Also posted in Passion, Team Building, Strengths | Comments closed

The strengths Interview four-step process from ‘First, Break All the Rules’

Here’s ‘The Art of Interviewing for Talent’ four-step process from First, Break All the Rules by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman. Make sure the talent interview stands alone. The purpose is to see if the candidate’s recurring patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior match the job. Ask a few open-ended questions and then keep quiet. Let him reveal himself by the choices he makes. What does he enjoy most about selling? How closely does he think people should be supervised? Listen for specifics. Ask him to tell you about the time when he closed a major deal. If the behavior is recurring, he can answer specifically off the top of his head. Clues to talent. There may be an inclination towards certain activities. Two things to notice: – Rapid learning. Does she take to public speaking like a born leader? – Satisfaction. Does he get his kicks from balancing the balance sheet? Know what to listen for. “I love it when…” Take note of what the employee says and after hiring, return to see if that person performed consistently with their original statements. Learn more: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action.

Also posted in Passion, Strengths, Sales | Comments closed

What strengths are useful for a salesperson?

Q: What strengths are useful for a salesperson? What would you say are the strengths I’d want to see in their StrengthsFinder top 5 if recruiting for sales? A: It depends on what kind of sales person you want. What kind of salesperson do you need – is it WOO or is it RELATOR? These two strengths are two sides of the sales coin. Is it more important for this person to be able to win over new people, especially suspicious people? For example, telemarketing, cold calling requires people to love winning strangers over. That’s the WOO StrengthsFinder theme. And it helps to have POSITIVITY (upbeat enthusiasm) when dealing with meanness, rudeness and rejection. Or is it more important for that person to cultivate deep and long-lasting relationships with key clients? That’s where RELATOR comes into play. This person is adept at cultivating deep and close relationships. WOO is breadth, RELATOR is depth. That’s just two strengths. A case could be made for every one of the 34 StrengthsFinder strengths being perfect for some aspect of sales. It’s up to you to figure out what would be perfect for the type of sales role you’re looking to fill. 34 are a lot to sift through though. There are two different categories of strengths that particularly relate to selling. What strengths category is most important to focus on for the role you’re trying to fill?

Also posted in Passion, Strengths, Sales | Comments closed