Category Archives: MBTI

Quix MBTI Tip: Your Senses Support Your Intuition

When trying to come up with innovative ideas, new possibilities or ways to connect different themes, use an activity that engages your five senses to ground you, either in the beginning as a preparation or as a break to renew yourself when you’re tired or burned out. 1 – Pick and perform a sensing activity you like. (Some examples: gardening, going for a walk, cooking a meal, painting, sculpting, raking leaves, chopping wood, exercise, yoga) 2 – Make sure it’s simple, somewhat physical, grounding, mildly repetitive and able to be completed in one session. 3 – While you’re engaged in the activity, focus on letting go of any future cares, concerns, worries and let yourself sink into a relaxed work state. 4 – Once the worries and tensions have dropped away and you’re more grounded in reality (hint: If life doesn’t look quite as dire and dour, you’re probably getting there), allow your mind to playfully wander where it wants to.  These light leaps from thought to thought are often the seeds of a richly functioning intuition. Gandhi used a spinning wheel. Carl Jung built miniature stone. They found that engaging their sense renewed the intuition function. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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How to Re-charge Your Battery if You Have the Introvert MBTI Preference

Pause. Take a short break from what you’re working on. Find a quiet place where you can be alone and undisturbed. Close your eyes and take some deep slow breaths. Let the demands of the outer world drain away each time you breathe out. Return to yourself. Then allow your mind to freely wander on its own inner exploration. The quieter the spot you’re in, the more quickly you can rejuvenate yourself, whether it’s a park bench outside, alone or a walk on a quiet path. If you can’t find a quiet spot in your office or outside go out to your car on your break, close your eyes, breathe and relax. If you’re in a very busy, loud environment, a bathroom stall will do in a pinch. It’s important to let go as much as possible of the external demands that are tugging at you, just for these few moments and return to yourself. It’s also helpful to take a short pause between activities. For example, if you’ve had a long drive in traffic, take a quiet moment by yourself before you go inside and meet whomever you are expecting at your destination. This gives your active internal life a chance to catch up with all of your external interactions. Another recharging method is to have a meaningful one-on-one conversation with a person you have a strong connection with, either in person or on the phone. This conversation often will give you even more energy than just quiet, alone time. However, don’t try this when your internal battery is on empty. It works best when you’re just a little depleted. Track what works bests for you. Whenever you are able to take a quick vacation from all externalities pulling at you, you will return to your work refreshed and ready to re-enter the challenges ahead of you. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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How to Re-charge Your Battery if You Have the Extravert MBTI Preference

When you’re tired, worn down and you need some energy to get your work done, try this tip. Extroversion Pause. Take a short break from what you’re working on. Get up from your desk and seek out someone to have a short conversation with. What – The topic isn’t important, but try to make it not be about your work at hand. It could be about sports, weather, politics, current events, an interesting bit of trivia you picked up. Or it could be curiosity about their family, favorite vacation spot, anything. Get curious – what would you like to know about this person? Who – Choose someone, even a stranger is fine, anyone that you’d feel comfortable talking with very briefly about anything you choose. Offer to get someone a cup of coffee or a snack, then have a quick chat with them. How – Try to have this conversation in person. A face-to-face conversation will give you the best shot at recharging your battery. If that isn’t possible, pick up the phone and call someone you know. Emailing and Instant Messaging is a third option, and will do in a pinch. After you’ve had your short conversation and you’re heading back to your work at hand, notice your energy level. Is your battery a little bit re-charged? If so, what about the conversation energized you? Get as specific as you can. The more clearly you can understand what energizes you, the more powerful a tool you can add to your re-charging tool-box. Now, head back to your work, refreshed and ready to re-enter the challenge ahead of you. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Quest Story – Carl Jung

In 1913, when Carl Jung was 44, he spent the better part of the year engaging daily in a sensing activity from his childhood that unlocked his work with his intuitive function confronting his own unconscious and paved the way for his concept of the collective unconscious. After his noon meal, Carl Jung played a building game he used to play when he was 11.  He walked along the lakeshore outside his home gathering small stones.  Then he built miniature villages complete with cottages, castles, and churches.  Weather permitting he did this every day until his patients arrived, and often continued into the evening after they left.  This daily sensing activity grounded him (Jung said, “in the course of this activity my thoughts clarified.”) and allowed his intuition function to leap freely (“I was able to grasp the fantasies whose presence in myself I dimly felt.”) Jung found it difficult to give himself over to this childhood game, despite its incredible value to him.  He said, “this…was a turning point in my fate, but I gave in only after endless resistances…for it was a painfully humiliating experience: to realize that there was nothing to be done except play childish games.” Still, he continued.  And when he questioned himself, “Now, really what are you about?” he answered by saying, “I had no answer…only the inner certainty that I was on the way to discovering my own myth.” Long after he stopped building his little villages, Jung continued to use his sensing function to support his intuitive work.  He said, “…at any time in my later life when I came up against a blank wall, I painted a picture or hewed stone.  Each such experience proved to be a rite de’ entrée for the ideas and works that followed hard upon it.” When his wife died he sculpted stone as a form of self-therapy.  “It cost me a great deal to regain my footing, and contact with stone helped me.” Carl Jung was the founder of analytical psychology.  His work connected science and logic with spirituality, eastern religion, literature and the arts.  Jung’s theory of psychological types formed the basis of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicatory (MBTI).  Some of his other contributions include the concept of the archetype, the collective unconscious, and synchronicity, which has influenced modern physicists. Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. MBTI Step II – Learn which of 20 different underlying facets are most important to you and guide you in every decision – how you communicate, where you focus your attention, how you make decisions, how you handle differences, how you approach deadlines, sequence tasks, and much, much more. MBTI Team Building Quest – MBTI Team Building Quest leverages fun team building activities and exercises to build strong MBTI teams.

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Heart King

My mantra so far this year has been Heart King. This means that I am ruling my life from my heart primarily. This is an interesting proposition, considering I work in corporate America, which is very much the province of the mind. Here the heart is looked upon with suspicion. And yet, this is my greatest strength. This is the best of me I have to offer myself the people in my life, and the people I try to help with my work. What do I mean by this? In Myers-Briggs terms my primary strength is introverted feeling. What this means is that I am best at identifying and living from my feelings and identifying the emotions of others, preferably in small groups. And even more preferably one on one. I have traditionally worked from my second greatest Myers Briggs strength – extroverted intuition. This is much more accepted in corporate America, and is generally a safer thing to reveal and live from. However, it is not my greatest strength. I truly enjoy it and feel energized when I use it but I am feeling called to use my greatest strength more explicitly in my work as well. And my StrengthsFinder assessment, taken numerous times over two decades, repeatedly lists my greatest strength as empathy. This is the feeling function in action. People around me know that I can go into an informal therapist mode. This can energize me but also burn me out. People who know me may also notice that I have steadily decreased that role in the last decade or so. I think what burns me out about it is that I have not been as good lately in aiming it at myself. Attempts at doing that I’ve been very calming and extremely helpful. I recommend it! I am in the process of revamping my offerings and the website. My old mode would be to just try to add more things on to find more clients that are new that would be attracted to something else. I’m trying something different this time around. I am letting things go that my heart is an excited about. And I am organizing things in order of what my heart is excited about and feels is most wonderful to offer, most helpful to people. Some people may be uncomfortable with the word heart, because after all our literal heart is just this organ that it’s pumping blood. If this is you, perhaps you could think of it in terms of the brain. The amygdala tries to keep us safe. The neo cortex wants connection. This is the neocortex in charge now, not the amygdala. It is helpful though, do you think of the heart as the metaphorical location of the neocortex. There is a reason we put a hand on our hearts as kids saying the Pledge of Allegiance. It would look a little weird if we put our hands on our heads while saying the Pledge of Allegiance. And just try giving a brain-shaped box of chocolates to your sweetie Valentine’s Day. So the metaphorical heart is in charge now for me. If you relish this idea, I recommend taking it on today as well. I believe we are all ready for some compassionate leadership.   Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.  

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The MBTI, DiSC, StrengthsFinder, Firo-B and Second Intelligence Smarts

I use lots of different assessments with teams. Four that I use frequently are MBTI, DiSC, StrengthsFinder and Firo-B. If you’re wondering, out of those, the MBTI is my favorite, StrengthsFinder my second favorite. Why? That’s the story for another day. What I’m most interested here is what they give people. These assessments give people a glimpse at what hides in plain sight, their second intelligence. The Persian poet Rumi says, “This second knowing is a fountainhead from within you, moving out… one already completed and preserved inside you. A spring overflowing its springbox.” This second intelligence is in our DNA, as unique to us as our fingerprints are. But there is little to no reinforcement in external life to access this intelligence. When you feel empty, missing something, not-enough, not-good-enough that’s a sign your second intelligence is being ignored. We’re often unused to putting our second intelligence in charge, or even knowing what that intelligence is for us. Personality assessments are a gateway into that world. Each person on a team begins to realize, “I am unique. I am different than these other people, and that’s a wonderful thing.” The Medicine Wheel teachings say that each of us entered the world in a unique spot on the wheel. Your second intelligence has much in common with mine, but it is unique to you. Your MBTI result may have a lot in common with mine, or not, but it’s unique to you. And even if we have the same result, how we live in that neighborhood is uniquely different. What unique way through your day will your second intelligence guide you through?   Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. Firo-B – Unlock the mysteries of human interaction. Improve working relationships within a team and individual effectiveness. DiSC – Help team members assess how they can best use each dimension of four behaviors – dominance, influence, steadiness, conscientiousness – to better communicate and work together. StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action.  

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Albert Einstein Asks If a Fish Can Climb a Tree

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” ~Albert Einstein If Albert Einstein tells me that I’m a genius, that you’re a genius too, I’m going to believe it! But the critic in each of us probably uses the word “stupid” way more than the word “genius” to describe our daily life choices. So clearly we’re using the wrong criteria. And if we’re being stupid perhaps it’s as simple as changing what we ask of ourselves. If we use our unique strengths – StrengthsFinder, MBTI, DiSC are all clues to what our strengths are that we were born with – to work on attainable goals we are passionate about then we’re geniuses. We are fish swimming in water. If we try to be someone we’re not but wish we were, we’re fish trying to climb a tree. What will you choose today – water or tree? PS – Wile E. Coyote is a super genius granted, but you and me? We can settle for genius. Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action. MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. DiSC – Help team members assess how they can best use each dimension of four behaviors – dominance, influence, steadiness, conscientiousness – to better communicate and work together.

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How Will Your Dreams Guide You?

When asked how he came up with the imaginative names for his characters, Mad Max director George Miller said, “Fever dreams… if they stick. But they always have to be appropriate for the world.” How imaginative are those names? Here are some: Max Rackatansky, Immortan Joe, Imperator Furiosa, Rictus Erectus, Nux, The Dag, The Organic Mechanic, Cheedo the Fragile, Keeper of the Seeds, Vuvalini, Coma the Doof Warrior, The People Eater, The Bullet Farmer, Toast the Knowing, The Splendid Angharad. We can be guided by our metaphorical dreams, or ignore them. Part of that is also being guided by our literal dreams. Swiss Psychologist Carl Jung, father of the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator), fearlessly listened to his dreams. I am still thankful for a recurring nightmare while a freshman in college for motivating me to get out of business school. What will help you remember your dreams, a dream journal, a recorder by your bed? How have your dreams guided you already? How will tonight’s dreams guide your tomorrow? “Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things that escape those who dream only at night.” – Edgar Allen Poe Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Are You Reaching For Individuation?

“I’ve gone from being very male dominant to being surrounded by magnificent women. I can’t help but be a feminist.” -Mad Max director George Miller He’s telling the truth. Here’s an excerpt from a different interview: “ I had no sister and all brothers, went to an all boys high school, went to medical school when there were very few women studying medicine. Beyond that I was really able to experience women through my two marriages and I had a really strong mom. In many ways we are seeing women as a healing force in the world and that’s in the zeitgeist and it kind of crept into the movie.” Miller’s wife, Margaret Sixel, edited the film. According to Miller, “I said, ‘You have to edit this movie, because it won’t look like every other action movie.” And after hearing her speak on Australian radio, Miller invited activist Eve Ensler to lead a workshop on-set in Namibia for the actresses who played the wives, to give “perspective on violence against women around the world, particularly in war zones.” All of this made for a very different kind of action movie, one unlike any we’ve seen before. We have a comfort zone that we’re cozy in…our cocoon. Curiosity about what vitality lives beyond the walls leads us to fresh and exciting territory. Carl Jung, the father of the MBTI (Myers Briggs Type Indicator), termed this quest for wholeness of self individuation. If we’re wise enough we move towards the opposite. We may marry someone very different than us, get curious about what makes people so different than us tick. We may slow down when we always have the urge to speed up. We may look for a common underlying story that has been told since the beginning of time that can envelope today’s fragmented world of hyper-activity. Miller moved from a male-centric world to a female-centric one. He also did it in a format that he loved – the action movie. Let’s keep reaching, keep looking, keep being curious. And let’s ground it in the unique passions that provide us with deep life force. Like Miller’s movie, our lives can be unlike any that’s been seen before. Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities:  MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. MBTI Target Topics – Target your MBTI session to address your team’s individual quest. Topics range from Customer Service to Sales to Diversity to Time Management. MBTI Step II – Learn which of 20 different underlying facets are most important to you and guide you in every decision – how you communicate, where you focus your attention, how you make decisions, how you handle differences, how you approach deadlines, sequence tasks, and much, much more. MBTI Communication Quest –Target your MBTI team building to increase your team’s communication effectiveness. MBTI Team Building Quest – MBTI Team Building Quest leverages fun team building activities and exercises to build strong MBTI teams.

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How ending well is a move towards individuation

Of the four preference pairs of the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) assessment, the fourth pair – judging and perceiving – is most applicable in examining how we end anything. My preference is for perceiving. I like to leave the door open to possibilities. Ending and moving on are not my favorite things to do. I remember even as a kid not wanting to take a bath, then not wanting to get out when I was done. The opposite preference is judging. This preference is very comfortable finishing things in an orderly, timely way. Swiss psychologist Carl Jung said that we were born with a certain preference (although he didn’t explicitly formulate the MBTI). Then as we mature we are gravitationally pulled to being more complete people, to explore all facets of life and all preference. He called this completion of the self individuation. Half of you are like me and prefer perceiving. On this last day of the year, let’s focus first on ending well. Let’s thank each obligation done or undone, each finishing and tuck it away from our consciousness. Here’s to ending 2014 well! Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s MBTI team building and team development activities: MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. MBTI Target Topics – Target your MBTI session to address your team’s individual quest. Topics range from Customer Service to Sales to Diversity to Time Management. MBTI Step II – Learn which of 20 different underlying facets are most important to you and guide you in every decision – how you communicate, where you focus your attention, how you make decisions, how you handle differences, how you approach deadlines, sequence tasks, and much, much more. MBTI Communication Quest –Target your MBTI team building to increase your team’s communication effectiveness. MBTI Team Building Quest – MBTI Team Building Quest leverages fun team building activities and exercises to build strong MBTI teams.

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