Category Archives: MBTI

Ask Questions If You Want to Influence Effectively

1 – Why ask questions? Your Brain On Questions True questions bypass the amygdala, an almond-shaped part of the brain that is like your body’s guard dog. When new information comes in, the amygdala decides, “is this a threat?” If it decides that there is a threat, even a low-level one, it will begin ‘barking’ and release chemicals that will help move you to physical safety more quickly. While that’s helpful in times of physical danger, it increases resistance to being influenced. By bypassing the amygdala with questions and engaging the neo-cortex you increase your chance of being a positive influence. Listen for Connection If you listen for ways to connect and be on the same side and areas of common ground, you increase resonance, something Howard Gardner describes as a key factor in changing someone’s mind. Request vs. Demand As Dr. Marshall Rosenberg notes in his book Nonviolent Communication, a request enlists the other person as a common ally and allows a person to independently choose to help, something we all long to do. A demand doesn’t give the option of choice and creates resistance Can You Handle the Truth? The challenge of questions is that you have to really want to hear the answers. If you ignore the person’s answer (both verbal and non-verbal), you destroy any resonance you have begun to create and give the other person a really good reason to feel resistance. And if you do hear a difficult answer, will you be able to both connect with them empathically and offer a substantive solution?

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Seven To-Do List Tips using the Perceiving MBTI preference

If you have the MBTI Perceiving preference you often find To Do lists hard…to do. You can do To Do lists better. Try these tips: 1. Get Curious Ask ‘what’s engaging my curiosity within this To-Do list? If you follow the items that most speak to your interest, you’ll enjoy what you’re doing more, which makes you more effective. 2. Quality Counts (How > What) Place a new column next to your To-Do items that says ‘quality’. Write down how you’d like to complete a task, not just the quantity of tasks. For example, ‘file my receipts playfully’ or ‘gracefully’, ‘exuberantly’, or ‘pretending I’m a musical robot’, whatever quality will get you interested in a looming mundane task. We all want a richer quality of life, and that can start with this moment by placing ‘process’ on the same level of importance as ‘product’. 3. Don’t Use Them If You Don’t Want To To Do lists may go against your grain. You may struggle with them, thinking you ‘should’ use them, only ‘highly effective people’ use them. Well, it may be a good time to let the war inside be over on this one. People who prefer perceiving would leave doors of opportunity open rather than finishing and closing one. The very idea of completing a To Do list, as much as you may long for it to be otherwise, goes against your nature. You don’t have to use them –  I won’t tell anyone. 4. Use the Small Size Tool There are times when the pain of a task sitting there for a prolonged period of time undone is greater than the pain of following a To Do list. Compose To Do lists task by task, breaking them down into really small chunks. Remember this is just a tool in your tool box; the list exists to serve you and your productivity, not the other way around. Use a prioritized, uncluttered doable list to complete a necessary task and then put the To Do list away. 5. Free Time Each Day Give yourself some time each day during which you are guided by your natural inquisitiveness, free from a To Do list. This will feed your perceiving preference, and will allow you to be more comfortable when you do live in the land of the To Do list. 6. Take the Weekend Off  If by the weekend you’re ‘To-Do Listed out’, you can be courageous and declare a ‘To Do’ list-free day or days. Allow yourself to amble out into the world in the unstructured way that best suits you. If you live each day all day by a To Do list, you’re going to end up drained, edgy, and dissatisfied because it’s going against your preference. If you find you enjoy your ‘To-Do List-free’ weekend move the concept out into parts of your work week. 7. Play with Judging  If you’re feeling playful, want to stretch, and want to grow– Use a To Do list in a case where you wouldn’t ordinarily think of using one, give yourself a time limit and get the task done. If it’s a repetitive task, time yourself and see if you can maximize your efficiency. Tick your tasks off one by one in the most satisfying way you can. If you find yourself delighted by your productivity and feel lighter from having gotten a task or two off your back, you now know the joy of judging. You could even finish a task early, well before it’s due. Try something new and see how the other half live. Bonus Tip: What Works For You? There are really helpful universal hints to putting together an effective To-Do list (such as ‘small bite that can be taken in one sitting, physical action taken by you,’ etc.) that are well chronicled elsewhere. Keep your preferences in mind when working with that material. Many time management books and trainings could be more effective if they incorporated more information that appeals to perceivers. If the blanket advice is just to live a judging life with more organization, then roughly half of the population is being asked to live a life that’s not them at their best. Conversely, being told to ‘move with the cheese’ when change happens or to ‘play’ while at work will only really speak to the half of the population who are perceivers, and does a disservice to judging people. Filter the suggestions in this and all articles through your natural preferences. Act on what you’re excited about, and leave behind what leaves you unmoved. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Three To-Do List Tips using the Judging MBTI preference

You can do To Do lists better if you have the MBTI Judging preference. Try this: 1. Get Structured  You probably have a high level of comfort with lists so the more structured you are, the greater your chance of success. Hone your To-Do list skills through reading and attending trainings. 2. Use Them Everywhere  Don’t be alarmed if your love of To Do lists spills over into non-work aspects of your life; this is your natural inclination. You can pack a lot of fun adventures into a too-short vacation, which is a wonderful trait. Just be sure to nicely tell your loved ones about your preference and that there’s a reason why you are who you are. 3. Exercise your Perceiving Side  Once your work is done, try allowing a small amount of time to be as unstructured as you can stand to be. Try showing up as late as you can stand for something (pick an event for which it doesn’t really matter whether you’re on time or not). Leave part of a To-Do list undone on purpose. Bonus Tip: What Works For You? There are really helpful universal hints to putting together an effective To-Do list (such as ‘small bite that can be taken in one sitting, physical action taken by you,’ etc.) that are well chronicled elsewhere. Keep your preferences in mind when working with that material. Many time management books and trainings could be more effective if they incorporated more information that appeals to perceivers. If the blanket advice is just to live a judging life with more organization, then roughly half of the population is being asked to live a life that’s not them at their best. Conversely, being told to ‘move with the cheese’ when change happens or to ‘play’ while at work will only really speak to the half of the population who are perceivers, and does a disservice to judging people. Filter the suggestions in this and all articles through your natural preferences. Act on what you’re excited about, and leave behind what leaves you unmoved. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Know yourself, Then Know Your Audience

It’s as if over 90% of your vision were obstructed. Driving to high school on icy mornings, that’s what my windshield looked like. Whatever your MBTI preference is, it’s probably your default mode of trying to influence others. The golden rule, right? But this only works if the others have the same function preference as you. There are 16 possible MBTI preference combinations. If you don’t think of other people and their preferences, your influencing attempts have a 6.25% chance of landing. That’s not going to cut it. It’s as if over 90% of your vision were obstructed while driving. Even though I made it safely (somehow) to school with such a small view, I’m smarter now. I’m not going to repeat that mistake again. I’m going to take the time to see more out of my windshield. And now you’re smarter too. Take the time and get a clear view of the people you’re trying to influence. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Everything I Ever Needed To Know I Learned By Watching Commercials

If you’ve ever watched a car or a beer commercial and wondered, “what the heck do these dancers/guys in bear suits/soccer moms/young gorgeous people having a great time at the beach have to do with the actual product?” the advertisers are probably aiming at your feeling function. They’re addressing the emotional side of buying a product and try to attach positive ‘feeling’ experiences to their product. If you see a commercial with technical advantages listed or an actor playing a medical doctor telling you that in medical tests two out of three people preferred pink medicated tissues over blue non-medicated ones, the advertisers are appealing to your thinking function. This is reflected in politics, especially on the national level. While the actual debates and political commentary news shows appeal to the thinking function, the overall image of a candidate is tailored to appeal to the feeling function of the average voter. Statistically, more people will be swayed by appeals to the feeling function. You need to address both MBTI functions – thinking and feeling – but spend more time on the feeling. The most persuasive arguments are ones that appeal to both the heart and the head – they appeal to the feeling side first but also have the data to back it up. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Influence Using Feeling

The big news: More people prefer the MBTI function of feeling than thinking when making decisions. So purely ‘rational’ arguments are going to be effective less than half the time. Focus more on influencing decisions by appealing to people’s feeling function. Answer these questions to include the feeling function: How will this benefit people and their needs? How will this lead to more harmony, cooperation and collaboration? Does this take into account people’s values? What are the positives of this for the people involved? Will this make the work environment more supportive and nurturing? Will anyone be hurt? Also important: Do your homework and have the facts to back up your appeal. But remember, the facts are your backup, not your first option. The exception to this is when you know that your audience primarily prefers the thinking function. Then you can just go with the facts. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Quix MBTI Tip: Your Senses Support Your Intuition

When trying to come up with innovative ideas, new possibilities or ways to connect different themes, use an activity that engages your five senses to ground you, either in the beginning as a preparation or as a break to renew yourself when you’re tired or burned out. 1 – Pick and perform a sensing activity you like. (Some examples: gardening, going for a walk, cooking a meal, painting, sculpting, raking leaves, chopping wood, exercise, yoga) 2 – Make sure it’s simple, somewhat physical, grounding, mildly repetitive and able to be completed in one session. 3 – While you’re engaged in the activity, focus on letting go of any future cares, concerns, worries and let yourself sink into a relaxed work state. 4 – Once the worries and tensions have dropped away and you’re more grounded in reality (hint: If life doesn’t look quite as dire and dour, you’re probably getting there), allow your mind to playfully wander where it wants to.  These light leaps from thought to thought are often the seeds of a richly functioning intuition. Gandhi used a spinning wheel. Carl Jung built miniature stone. They found that engaging their sense renewed the intuition function. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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How to Re-charge Your Battery if You Have the Introvert MBTI Preference

Pause. Take a short break from what you’re working on. Find a quiet place where you can be alone and undisturbed. Close your eyes and take some deep slow breaths. Let the demands of the outer world drain away each time you breathe out. Return to yourself. Then allow your mind to freely wander on its own inner exploration. The quieter the spot you’re in, the more quickly you can rejuvenate yourself, whether it’s a park bench outside, alone or a walk on a quiet path. If you can’t find a quiet spot in your office or outside go out to your car on your break, close your eyes, breathe and relax. If you’re in a very busy, loud environment, a bathroom stall will do in a pinch. It’s important to let go as much as possible of the external demands that are tugging at you, just for these few moments and return to yourself. It’s also helpful to take a short pause between activities. For example, if you’ve had a long drive in traffic, take a quiet moment by yourself before you go inside and meet whomever you are expecting at your destination. This gives your active internal life a chance to catch up with all of your external interactions. Another recharging method is to have a meaningful one-on-one conversation with a person you have a strong connection with, either in person or on the phone. This conversation often will give you even more energy than just quiet, alone time. However, don’t try this when your internal battery is on empty. It works best when you’re just a little depleted. Track what works bests for you. Whenever you are able to take a quick vacation from all externalities pulling at you, you will return to your work refreshed and ready to re-enter the challenges ahead of you. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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How to Re-charge Your Battery if You Have the Extravert MBTI Preference

When you’re tired, worn down and you need some energy to get your work done, try this tip. Extroversion Pause. Take a short break from what you’re working on. Get up from your desk and seek out someone to have a short conversation with. What – The topic isn’t important, but try to make it not be about your work at hand. It could be about sports, weather, politics, current events, an interesting bit of trivia you picked up. Or it could be curiosity about their family, favorite vacation spot, anything. Get curious – what would you like to know about this person? Who – Choose someone, even a stranger is fine, anyone that you’d feel comfortable talking with very briefly about anything you choose. Offer to get someone a cup of coffee or a snack, then have a quick chat with them. How – Try to have this conversation in person. A face-to-face conversation will give you the best shot at recharging your battery. If that isn’t possible, pick up the phone and call someone you know. Emailing and Instant Messaging is a third option, and will do in a pinch. After you’ve had your short conversation and you’re heading back to your work at hand, notice your energy level. Is your battery a little bit re-charged? If so, what about the conversation energized you? Get as specific as you can. The more clearly you can understand what energizes you, the more powerful a tool you can add to your re-charging tool-box. Now, head back to your work, refreshed and ready to re-enter the challenge ahead of you. Learn more: MBTI Team Quest - Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together.

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Quest Story – Carl Jung

In 1913, when Carl Jung was 44, he spent the better part of the year engaging daily in a sensing activity from his childhood that unlocked his work with his intuitive function confronting his own unconscious and paved the way for his concept of the collective unconscious. After his noon meal, Carl Jung played a building game he used to play when he was 11.  He walked along the lakeshore outside his home gathering small stones.  Then he built miniature villages complete with cottages, castles, and churches.  Weather permitting he did this every day until his patients arrived, and often continued into the evening after they left.  This daily sensing activity grounded him (Jung said, “in the course of this activity my thoughts clarified.”) and allowed his intuition function to leap freely (“I was able to grasp the fantasies whose presence in myself I dimly felt.”) Jung found it difficult to give himself over to this childhood game, despite its incredible value to him.  He said, “this…was a turning point in my fate, but I gave in only after endless resistances…for it was a painfully humiliating experience: to realize that there was nothing to be done except play childish games.” Still, he continued.  And when he questioned himself, “Now, really what are you about?” he answered by saying, “I had no answer…only the inner certainty that I was on the way to discovering my own myth.” Long after he stopped building his little villages, Jung continued to use his sensing function to support his intuitive work.  He said, “…at any time in my later life when I came up against a blank wall, I painted a picture or hewed stone.  Each such experience proved to be a rite de’ entrée for the ideas and works that followed hard upon it.” When his wife died he sculpted stone as a form of self-therapy.  “It cost me a great deal to regain my footing, and contact with stone helped me.” Carl Jung was the founder of analytical psychology.  His work connected science and logic with spirituality, eastern religion, literature and the arts.  Jung’s theory of psychological types formed the basis of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicatory (MBTI).  Some of his other contributions include the concept of the archetype, the collective unconscious, and synchronicity, which has influenced modern physicists. Explore this idea more fully in Quixote Consulting’s team building and team development activities: MBTI Team Quest – Discover and leverage the various ways your people make decisions, strategize and access information, using this organizational standard. Team members begin to recognize the strengths that other types bring to the team, and the power that comes from multiple types working together. MBTI Step II – Learn which of 20 different underlying facets are most important to you and guide you in every decision – how you communicate, where you focus your attention, how you make decisions, how you handle differences, how you approach deadlines, sequence tasks, and much, much more. MBTI Team Building Quest – MBTI Team Building Quest leverages fun team building activities and exercises to build strong MBTI teams.

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