Globally, what percent of employees are either not engaged or are actively disengaged at work?

Globally, what percent of employees are either not engaged or are actively disengaged at work?

85%

That’s most of us. It’s a sobering number. The U.S. numbers are a little better. As of 2018, 34% – a third – employees are actively engaged. That still means 2/3 of us aren’t. 

So there’s work to be done, by all of us. 

To be kinder to each other because so many of us are unhappy. And all of us humans want to be happy.

And to help each other find a way through to engagement with our work. An engaged person is a happier, more fulfilled person. 

And it starts with finding, then using, our #1 engagement tool we were born with – our strengths

Learn more: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action.

(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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What accounts for 70% of the variance in team engagement?

What accounts for 70% of the variance in team engagement?

  1. Manager/team leader
  2. Time spent together face-to-face
  3. Team diversity
  4. Clear goal

The answer?

A – the manager or team leader. 

It’s (almost) all on you as a leader to make or break this team. Which one will it be, make…or break? Learn the strengths of your people, develop them and pick the right roles for each person, no matter how difficult those decisions may be.

Learn more: Team Collaboration Quest – How can we communicate effectively with each other? How can we trust each other and take risks? What are the stages of team development? What do we do best? How do we look at the big picture and see how our individual contributions create success for all of us? 


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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40 Days to Change for Good begins

40 Days to Change for Good begins once again November 11th. This annual tradition (started in 2010) is a simple 40-day ritual of daily working-on-something-that-matters. It has been profoundly helpful to many readers. 

Pick something you want to change for good or move ahead on something large that you’re having difficulty persisting with. Day 40 begins November 11 (Veterans Day) and Day Zero is December 21 (the Winter Solstice). Learn more in my e-book (free to you) here. And I’ll be writing more in my blog as well. 

Curious about what I’m working on this year? I’m focusing on efficiency. Doing work-related tasks – especially things I don’t love doing – quickly and simply. Less polish, more progress. And more time open to enjoy just being and enjoying this precious life.

One of the tactics to make your change project real and for you to complete it is to make it public. What do you want to change for good this year? I’ll make it public for you in the next newsletter.

And if you want to help your team make a change for good, book either How To Complete a Project or the 40 Days to Change for Good change leadership team development for January and beyond.

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What are the right strengths to have on a team?

What are the right strengths to have on a team?

Teams ask me this question all the time during StrengthsFinder trainings. “Do we have the right strengths? What are we missing?” 

Gallup found something interesting when they tried to figure out the right strengths to have on a team. They found it doesn’t matter as much what the composition of team strengths is. What matters most is the awareness of the strengths that are on the team already. 

You can’t use the tools you don’t know you have. Take the StrengthsFinder assessment with your team, link it to what it looks like in real life and expand from there.

Learn more: StrengthsFinder – Gallup’s online assessment of unique top five strengths. Learn your team’s strengths and learn how to put them into action.

(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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Why the Nationals should win the World Series

Why did I root for the Washington Nationals to win the World Series? I don’t follow baseball at all and haven’t in about forty years. And I have no ties to this team locationally. Here’s why.

They celebrate well.

Mini shark, group hugs, cheap sunglasses, home run dances (thirteen different ones can be found here). They know how to celebrate. One of the announcers observed that they’ve probably started working on these celebrations in training camp. I hope they did.

Most work teams miss out on a celebration aspect. They act like work is a war, with no room for celebration – only for pushing harder.  

What if work is actually a game? What if it was safe to celebrate successes along the way? What if today was safe enough to celebrate something, anything with your team?

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What percent of employees strongly agree that their manager knows what projects they’re working on?

What percent of employees strongly agree that their manager knows what projects they’re working on?

34%. Only a third. 

It’s 9 AM. Do you know where your people are? What are they working on?

Learn moreStrong Management – Strengths based training for managers to help their people be at their best.


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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What percent of employees received feedback from their manager “a few times or less” last year?

What percent of employees received feedback from their manager “a few times or less” last year?

47%. That’s almost half. 

If you’re a manager and you want to get more engagement from the people you manage, you need to up your game. Give more feedback, more often, and more quality feedback – millennials and Gen Z especially.

Learn moreStrong Management – Strengths based training for managers to help their people be at their best.


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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Three things a manager needs to coach

Three things a manager needs to coach:

  1. Establish expectations
  2. Continually coach
  3. Create accountability
  1. Establish expectations

According to Gallup, employees whose manager involves them in setting goals is four times more likely to be engaged. But only 30% of employees ever get this opportunity.

  1. Continually coach

Employees are three times more likely to be engaged if they get daily feedback than annual feedback.

  1. Create accountability

Metrics are needed.

Learn moreStrong Management – Strengths based training for managers to help their people be at their best.


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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Five steps to building a strengths-based culture

According to Gallup, there are five steps to building a strengths-based culture. 

  1. Start with the CEO or it doesn’t work.
  2. Require every employee to discover their strengths.
  3. Build an internal network of strengths coaches.
  4. Integrate strengths into performance management.
  5. Transform your learning programs.

Here are some notes on each of these.

  1. Start with the CEO or it doesn’t work.

People watch what their leaders do and say. And there’s a finely honed BS detector. In team building sessions if I see the leader isn’t engaged and involved, I know the team is going to struggle – during the activity and beyond.

  1. Require every employee to discover their strengths.

Using StrengthsFinder or MBTI gives everyone on a team a common language to talk about unique abilities.

  1. Build an internal network of strengths coaches.

Who are your strengths champions in the organization? How can they coach your high potentials?

  1. Integrate strengths into performance management.

Mangers need to know their own strengths and use them. Then they need to know their people’s strengths and unlock them.

  1. Transform your learning programs.

Get rid of any learning programs that don’t focus on strengths. Strengths are your rocket fuel.

Learn more: Strong Management –  Strengths based training for managers to help their people be at their best.


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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Six changes Millennials and Generation Z want

Millennials (born 1980-1996) and Gen Z (born after 1996) want something new from work. According to Gallup, here are six ‘wants’ that are different.

Past (workers used to want this)Future
My paycheck My purpose
My satisfactionMy development
My bossMy coach
My annual reviewMy ongoing conversations
My weaknessesMy strengths
My jobMy life

What does this mean?

  1. A paycheck is no longer enough. There needs to be meaning to the work. Who and how is this helping?
  2. Beer kegs and ping pong tables don’t get workers excited anymore. Their growth is what they care about.
  3. Less hierarchy, more help.
  4. Feedback once a year is useless. Short ongoing feedback, especially digitally, instead.
  5. Strengths develop infinitely. Focus on strengths.
  6. “Does this organization care about who I am, what I do well? Can I do what I do best every day? If not, I’m gone.”

Learn more: Generations Collaborate – Learn about the different generations that make up your workforce and team. Set the stage for true collaboration on your team by finding out what makes each generation unique, how they prefer to communicate, get work done, their triggers for excellent performance, and their triggers for conflict.


(data from It’s the Manager book by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter) 

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